How to Take Basic Marine Photos

1. Front/Rear Full View

Stand directly in front of the watercraft and position the camera parallel to the front. Capture the full view of the image and eliminate as much of the background as possible. For the best angle, you may need to squat depending on the size of the vessel. The following photos are required:

a. Front Full View

 

b. Rear Full View

 

2. Right Side/Left Side Full View

Take several steps away from the side of the watercraft. Center the frame of the photo to capture the entire vessel straight on in one shot and eliminate as much of the background as possible. The following photos are required:

a. Right Side Full View

 

b. Left Side Full View

 

3. Engine

Take a full view of the engine, if possible.

 

 

4. Engine Prop/Jets/Rudder

Take a close-up photo showing the full view of the engine prop, jets, or rudder on the vessel.

 

 

5. Driver Dash Panel

Take a full view of the dash panel including the steering wheel, operator controls, and gauges (if applicable).

 

 

6. Hour Meter

Ask the owner or onsite contact to show the hour meter (make sure the numbers are visible) and take a straight on photo of the hour meter. Be sure to check your photos before you leave the site to verify that all numbers are visible.

7. VIN

Locate the manufacturer sticker on the vessel. Position the camera directly in front of the sticker. Zoom in toward the printed text. Eliminate as much background as possible. For best results, you may need to take 2-3 extra photos. Be sure to check your photos before you leave the site to verify that the numbers are visible.

 

8. Interior

Take a full view of the interior from the rear of the vessel. Take a full view of the interior from the front of the vessel.

 

 

9. Damage 

Inspect the exterior and interior of the watercraft. Actively look for dents, scratches, or signs of damage. Zoom into the location of any damage and take a straight on shot. Eliminate any glare from the sun as well as unwanted background images. Be sure to note the damage in the 'comments section' of the report and provide approximate measurements and a description of the location of the damage.

 

 

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